WELCOME TO THE 2/27TH DELTAHOUNDS A SITE FOR ALL WOLFHOUNDS

Welcome Wolfhounds

 

DURING THE REORGANIZATION OF THE 27TH INF REGIMENT, 2ND BATTALION, IN SEPTEMBER OF 1967, DELTA COMPANY WAS FORMED FROM MEMEBERS OF THE OTHER COMPANY'S OF THE 2ND BATTALION. MOST OF THOSE MEN STILL HAVE A LOYALTY TO THEIR OLD COMPANY. BUT WHETHER THEY KNEW IT OR NOT, THEY WOULD BE THE BEGINNINGS OF ONE OF THE MOST STORIED COMPANY'S OF THE WOLFHOUNDS. FROM THE DOG FACE SOUTH TO THE PARROTS BEAK. THEN EAST TO SIAGON AND NORTH TO DAU TIANG, AND BACK TO THE BLACK VIRGIN, THE WOLFHOUNDS FOUGHT. THE DELTAHOUNDS WERE THERE EVERY STEP OF THE WAY. THE DELTAHOUNDS INVITE YOU TO READ OUR STORIES, AND OUR LETTERS HOME FROM THE "NAM". LOOK AT OUR PICTURES' AND SEE HOW WE WERE THEN AND HOW WE ARE NOW. SAY A PRAYER FOR THOSE THAT DIDN'T COME HOME, AND TELL THE ONE'S THAT DID, THANKS. AND SAY ANOTHER PRAYER FOR THOSE THAT CAME HOME BUT DIDN'T REALLY.

 

Comments

brucew

Do you know Risky and Mike "red" Rosenthal? Dang it Like i said before, glad I wasn't there. Hope you don't mind if I make a page to go with Geralds story. just more of our lore.

shammer

Diamonds

I joined 1st platoon Delta Company in early January 1969 at FSB Reed. We did sweeps and AP's around Reed until sometime around the 10th of Feb and then was choppered west to the Cambodian border and built FSB Diamond in front of a large village. Parts of Delta and Alpha company were there.Alpha company had the south half and Delta the north half of the perimeter. I was on the last Delta company bunker facing due west.
We ran sweeps Lp's and Ap's along with Alpha company. One morning after coming back in off an AP, we passed thru an area we had went thru the night before, except now there were lots of small NVA flags sticking in the groud and one large NVA flag on a pole. Arlie Griffus from Decator Ala. got thet flag and still has it today.I've often wondered what went on there that night.
Sometime later on. Captain Sharp anf Lt. Castonia took a volenteer patrol out at night. They hadn,t gotten far to the west when they ran into NVA. Several gooks were killed, but we lost Mike Rowe KIA.
On the night of Feb 22nd they hit us--hard. I have never seen such fire works as I saw that night. We fought all night. Sometime during the fight, word came down the bunker line that gooks were in the wire. Scared hell out of me. Airstrikes and chopper gunships were called in on Alpha companies side of the peremeter. Later I found out there was only one A company bunker betweem mine and the gooks.
When the fighting died down, they came around and pulled one man off D company bunkers to man A company bunkers. Me and Doug Hinkel were together on an A company bunker.
As daylight started to break. We could see dead gooks laying everywhere. Doug found a nine mm pistol on one right in front of the bunker. We could also see the dead A company men in the bunker. A sight I will never forget. They Killed 15 of us that night, mostly from A company.
Doug was killed later that morning checking out a dead gook. He was less than 10 yards from me when he was shot. He was our only loss during the fight.
They hit us again two nights later. B company had repalced A company and they lost one man and again we got lucky and didn't lose anyone
We moved later on that day to Tay Nigh and stayed there the month of March.
Then came April and Diamonds Two and Three. But thats another story.

thanks Gerald I'll make a page for it

Still getting things sorted out with the programmer on getting the right way to save every thing right now I will make this as part of the set pages. I still have trouble finding things that I've put up. so can understand if others have the same problem. This will show up as a blog in the next day or so. Thanks so much.

shammer

My Reflections of Diamond I and after......

Bravo Co of the 2/27th was designated as a reactionary force to be on stand-by
to help units that got into trouble. 2nd Pltn Bravo Co was sent to help re-enforce
our sister companies, Alpha, Charlie and Delta, at Diamond I, we arrived early
morning Feb 23. We went out on a sweep to take body counts and police up the
bodies for burial and collect weapons and ammo. The NVA had broken thru the
perimeter the night before and blown some bunkers with satchel charges. The
other companies had lost many men, KIA and WIA's, from that ground attack.
They brought in equipment to dig the trenches between bunkers, bulldozers to
dig the mass graves. We spent the rest of that day and the next day rebuilding
bunkers and the perimeter, getting ready for the next ground attack that they
assured us was going to happen again. The next night when the attack started,
they scattered us (2nd Pltn) clear around most of the perimeter. I was on the
bunker line that faced the village. I think one gun crew M60 (Oehrli, Nietz, and
Branham) was to my right, the other gun crew (Dedeaux, Rhodes, and Burt)
was somewhere on further around the perimeter toward the Cambodian side.
Everyone else was scattered out between and beyond the gun crews. I can't
really tell you what the others went thru, due to our separation that night. The
next morning, we probably talked a little about things that happened that night,
but really didn't talk much about it even later, we were very busy for several
days afterward. But I'm sure it was embedded in each and every one of our
minds, and will go to the grave with each of us. It was a long night, to say the
least. Civilian Vietnamese had come to the wire in the late afternoon telling us
that boko NVA were coming. At dusk, we could see huge bonfires in the distance
on the three sides of us, away from the village side of our perimeter. Don’t know
if it was true, but we were told later that we had top priority for air strikes and
artillery that night. The sky was lite up like daylight with continuous illumination
the whole night, but the dirt and dust in the air was so thick you could almost
cut it with a knife, at times you could n't see across the small perimeter. All due
from the surrounding artillery, mortar, and air support, and of course, the
in-coming enemy ground fire and their bombardment of mortars, rockets and
RPG’s.

It started shortly after the sun went down and lasted until just before daylight. As
I said, it was a long night. I was between the first and second bunker from the
left, on the village side. At the peak of the heaviest mortar attack, tried to get in
the corner bunker, but it was full, so I spent the whole night firing from the trench
between bunkers. The village was a "no fire zone", even though they kept bringing
cases of "Laws" to us. It seem like they had fifty mortar tubes zeroed in on us
from the village, we could see the muzzle flashes. Finally, we said, "piss on it"
and started firing laws into the damned village. At one point, a spotter plane came
in and dropped a white phosphorus round "between the wires" right in front of us,
and then here come the jet, he made a trial pass, and was coming around to make
his drop. We were screaming our brains out all this time, when they finally got him
called off just as he was coming in on his final pass. We all had crap in our pants,
litterly. At one point, I was down in the trench reloading my magazines, a mortar
round hit right on the edge of the trench behind me, it caved in on top of me. I
was completely covered up with dirt.....I thought it was all over. I don't know if I
was unconscience for any length of time from the blast and impact. The next thing I
knew, I had got my head up out of there and got a gulp of air. I realized I was still
alive and only seemed to have effects from the concussion. I found my steal pot,
then my M-16, then my magazines and ammo. The bolt and dust cover was open,
and the chamber was full of dirt, and I knocked as much dirt out of it as I could. I
knocked as much dirt as I could out of my magazines. I took my bottle of LSA
lubricant and squirted some in the open chamber, and I also squirted a small amount
down the barrel. I fully did not expect it to fire. Knowing it would probably explode
in my face, I slammed a magazine home, and jumped up and let loose on "well done".
And to my surprise it worked, 18 rounds and a lot of smoke, but by God, to my
amazement, the damned thing worked.

I just know, that the 2nd Pltn of Bravo Co. helped save that perimeter that night.
We lost Walton Daley that night in the corner bunker opposite where I was. His
job was to stay in the bunker and fire off the claymores when they hit the wire. It
was raining mortars and RPG's. A mortar round hit close out front of the bunker
and a piece of shrapnel came thru the rifle port and struck him in his jugular vein.
He bled to death in the bottom of the bunker. Jim Overly just told me recently at
a reunion, he was at that bunker with Daley. Daley was a "newbie", and he kept
raising up to look out. Jim said he kept telling him to "stay down, I'll tell you when
to fire them", but the last time he raised up, he got hit. Jim tried to help him, and
called for a medic, he just lost to much blood to quickly, they weren't able to save
him. He was the only KIA that night. After it was all over, we swept the area,
came back in, started tearing down the perimeter, and we put it all on choppers.
Filled in all the holes in the ground, policed the whole damned area for anything
that would have indicated that GI's had been there, crawled on the choppers, and
off we were on our way to build another perimeter. We had to have overhead
cover by dark in our new location, FSB Ayres, and be ready for night patrols.
In the months to follow, there would be a Diamond II, III and IV.
...........Diamonds Forever.

The next day after dismantling and policing up Diamond I, they picked us up by
chopper and took us to the new spot to start building FSB Ayres where we got
back with our company. There was a village a short distance away, and our job
was to build a Bn. size perimeter as fast as possible. We spent 2-1/2 days building
it. At night, of course, we pulled LP's and bunker guard, no ambushes. The first
night, VC set up rockets on one side of us in a hedgerow, as if we were not even
there. They were getting ready to fire on the village that I mentioned, and we were
in between them and the village, the bunkerline and a LP spotted them, the bunker
line started firing dooper rounds in on them and the LP called in mortars, and blew
them away. The next morning when we went out to sweep the area, we couldn't
believe they had been so dumb. We had again gone with virtually no sleep for
three days and two nights due to being on alert, then they let us sleep all night.
On the next morning, choppers came in and picked us up and another unit (never
knew who it was) came in and took over our perimeter that we had just busted
our butts building, and they flew us out. A lot of stuff was happening in a short
period of time. I did write a letter to my wife on Feb 27th saying: "They have
worked us to death. I went 90 hours with no sleep. In that 90 hours I was in three
mortar attacks, one human wave, we tore down Diamond and now are building
FSB Ayres. Ayres is only 8 clicks northwest of Cu Chi. We have worked day and
night for the last 2-1/2 days, I've only gotten about 4 hrs. sleep in that length of time
I am writing this to you so you know why I haven't been writing." I wrote again on
Mar 4th: "We spent 3 days at Ayres, then they moved us out. They choppered us to
Cu Chi, then flew us out o there to Tay Nihn, they gave us the night down, the next
morning they convoyed us out to FSB Washington which is only fifteen miles from
Nui Ba Dien, and 15 clicks from C.border Since I wrote last I'd had a span of 72
hrs.with 1-1/2 hrs. sleep, but I've had two good nights sleep since then, so I'm
almost back in shape again. This has been one hell of a 8 to 10 days period." Then
we started going out on 1 to 6 day loggers (day sweep, night AP), we were on the
move all the time, we were being jerked around like a yo-yo.
The joys of being a ground-pounder in Vietnam.

Gerald Maddock 2nd Pltn Bravo Co 2/27 Wolfhounds